naxus in gut health formula

4 reasons to include Naxus® in your gut health formulation

4 reasons to include Naxus® in your gut health formulation

Maastricht, 15th March, 2024

Arabinoxylans are essential prebiotics that exert beneficial effects on human health, particularly gut health. The relationship between diet and gut health has gained popularity in the last decades, with promising research emerging at an increasingly rapid pace. For product developers, it can be challenging to decide which ingredients to include in their gut formulation. In this article, you will discover 4 compelling reasons to include Naxus® in your gut health formulation.

What is Naxus®?

Naxus® is a patent-protected, prebiotic arabinoxylan extract sourced from the wheat endosperm. It can boost the immune system and improve gut health.

Solabia-BioActor developed Naxus® and conducted extensive research in collaboration with Maastricht University, Wageningen University & Research, Institute Pasteur and more, demonstrating its positive effects in numerous studies.

Clinical research in diverse populations shows that Naxus® promotes gut health by improving intestinal barrier function, increasing beneficial micro-organisms (e.g., Bifidobacteria and Bacteroides), improving the short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) profile and inducing cytokine and chemokine production (1, 2, 3).

Naxus® exerts its beneficial effects at doses starting at 1 g. Click below to see the scientific evidence.

4 reasons why Naxus® is a great addition to gut health formulations

If you are considering including Naxus® in your formulation for gut health, you should consider the following aspects:

 

1. Naxus® improves SCFA profile and strengthens the gut barrier

Health-promoting micro-organisms are present in the gut and help to protect the gut wall from pathogens and bad bacteria. Studies have demonstrated that Naxus® supports the growth of beneficial microbiota (1). Consequently, these microbiota produce advantageous SCFAs like propionate and butyrate.

SCFA production is related to a variety of positive health effects. To illustrate, these metabolites reduce the risk of developing inflammation and promote psychological and physical health. Moreover, they regulate the host immune system and improve metabolic health (4, 5).

 

2. Naxus® supports the immune system 

Naxus® has proven immunomodulatory properties by enhancing gut barrier integrity and improving the adaptive and innate immune system.

Research indicates that Naxus® improves multiple gut barrier parameters such as reduced intestinal permeability, increased goblet cell number, and higher intestinal immunoglobin A concentrations (6).

Additionally, Naxus® has been shown to increase vaccination efficacy against influence resulting in fewer adverse events, fewer respiratory tract infections, and improved seroprotection rates (7).

Moreover, Naxus® improves the innate immune system, leading to an increased immune system vigilance (2, 3).

 

3. Naxus® is slowly fermentable without bloating

Naxus® is composed of long and complex carbohydrate molecules, that ferment slowly and gradually (8). Therefore, Naxus® has an advantage over other fibres like inulin, because it does not cause intestinal complaints such as bloating and gas formation in the gut.

 

4. Naxus® can be used in many formulation types

Arabinoxylans, with their favourable physicochemical properties, have been successfully incorporated into numerous food products. Naxus® is wheat-derived and gluten-free and is therefore suitable for various formulations.

Naxus® has an emulsifying capacity and influences the viscosity of multiple foods. Its effects have been tested in products such as pasta, bread, beer, cakes, and cookies. For example, in the bread-making processes, arabinoxylans positively affect dough consistency, loaf volumes, crumb structure, and bread staling.

These beneficial technological characteristics prove the potential to include Naxus® in any gut health formulation.

 

Naxus®, the key ingredient for your gut health formulation

Naxus® contributes to your gut health by improving the microbiome, protecting the intestinal gut barrier, and supporting the immune system. It is a patent-protected product that bears an EFSA claim for reduction of post-prandial glycemic response and can be incorporated into multiple food products due to its beneficial properties.

Its innovative and science-based nature makes it a valuable addition to optimise your gut health formulation!


gut skin axis Bonolive

How does your digestive system affect your skin health?

The gut-skin axis: how does your digestive system affect your skin health?

Maastricht, 29th February 2024

The gut-skin axis defines the relationship between the gut microbiota and skin health. Factors such as diet, microbial diversity, and gut barrier integrity are pivotal in modulating this axis. Understanding this relationship offers avenues for holistic dermatological interventions targeting gut health and is the subject of this article.

gut skin axis Bonolive

What is the Gut microbiome?

The gut microbiome refers to the community of microorganisms residing in the gastrointestinal tract (1). This intricate ecosystem plays a pivotal role in various physiological processes, from digestion and nutrient absorption to immune system regulation (2). Furthermore, the gut microbiome is integral to synthesizing vitamins, metabolizing drugs, and maintaining gut barrier function (3).

 

Several factors can influence the composition and diversity of the gut microbiome. Diet, particularly the consumption of fiber-rich foods, can shape microbial populations (4). Additionally, antibiotics, stress, and lifestyle choices such as smoking can significantly impact microbial balance (5)

 

 

What is the role of the skin for health?

The skin, the body’s largest organ, serves as a protective barrier against external factors, regulating temperature, and facilitating sensory perception (6). It plays a crucial role in immune surveillance, defending against pathogens and environmental insults (7). The skin’s health is influenced by numerous factors, including genetics, age, sun exposure, and environmental pollutants (8).

 

Common issues encompass a range of conditions, from acne and eczema to more severe disorders often influenced by both genetic predisposition and environmental triggers (9). Maintaining skin health requires a balanced approach addressing both intrinsic and extrinsic factors affecting this vital organ.

 

What is the link between the gut and the skin?

The gut-skin axis represents the relationship between gut health and skin conditions, suggesting that alterations in gut microbiota can influence dermatological health (10). This bidirectional communication system involves various mechanisms linking gut health to skin conditions (11). For example, increased gut permeability, or “leaky gut,” may lead to systemic inflammation, exacerbating skin inflammation characteristic of acne (12). Additionally, dysregulated gut flora can compromise immune tolerance, potentially contributing to allergic skin reactions seen in eczema (13).

 

Understanding the gut-skin axis offers insights into approaches for managing skin conditions by targeting gut health. Modulating gut microbiota through dietary interventions or probiotics may offer promising therapeutic strategies for dermatological health.

Factors influencing the gut-skin axis?

The gut-skin axis is influenced by various factors, encompassing lifestyle, medication, and diet. Lifestyle choices, including stress levels and sleep patterns, can significantly impact gut microbiota composition, subsequently affecting skin health. Chronic stress, for instance, can disrupt gut microbial balance, contributing to systemic inflammation and exacerbating skin conditions like acne (14, 15).

 

Dietary habits play a pivotal role in shaping the gut microbiome, with fiber-rich diets promoting microbial diversity and beneficial gut flora. Conversely, diets high in processed foods and sugars can foster dysbiosis, potentially aggravating skin conditions like acne and eczema (16).

 

Understanding these influencing factors offers avenues for targeted interventions to optimize the gut-skin axis, emphasizing the interconnectedness of lifestyle, medication, and dietary choices in dermatological health.

 

Which nutrients benefit skin health?

Several nutrients play pivotal roles in promoting optimal skin health:

Omega-3 fatty acids support skin hydration and combat inflammation, benefiting conditions like eczema (17).
Vitamin E acts as an antioxidant, protecting skin cells from oxidative damage and promoting skin elasticity (18).
Vitamin C aids collagen synthesis, essential for skin structure and wound healing (19).
Zinc supports skin cell regeneration and immune function, contributing to overall skin vitality (20).
Oleuropein, a compound primarily found in olive leaves, holds promise in lowering skin inflammation and supporting skin hydration due to its moisturizing and antimicrobial properties (21). Bonolive® is an olive leaf extract standardized for high levels of oleuropein.

 

Conclusion

In summary, the gut-skin axis connects gut microbiota to skin health, influenced by factors like diet and medications. Nutrients like oleuropein, omega-3s, vitamin E, vitamin C and zinc promote skin health, emphasizing the importance of diet in dermatological well-being.


benefits of prebiotics

What are prebiotics? Types and health benefits

What are prebiotics? Types and health benefits

Last updated: February 22nd, 2024

February 7th, 2022

Prebiotics are a big topic in nutrition these days. As with probiotics, their relationship with human health has gathered a lot of interest in recent years. Prebiotics are compounds derived from non-digestible carbohydrates that confer health benefits to the host by selectively stimulating the growth of intestinal bacteria.

benefits of prebiotics

What are prebiotics?

Prebiotics are non-digestible food ingredients that confer health benefits to the host by selectively stimulating the growth and/or activity of a limited number of our intestinal bacteria [1].

Fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS), galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS), and trans-galacto-oligosaccharides (TOS) are the most common prebiotics.

Fermentation of prebiotics by gut microbiota produces short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), such as lactate, butyrate, and propionate. These SCFAs have multiple beneficial effects on the body and gut health, as SCFAs are small enough to enter blood circulation through gut cells.

The difference between probiotics and prebiotics is that, while probiotics are beneficial bacteria, prebiotics are the food for these bacteria. Both are important for human health, but they have different roles. Probiotics are live bacteria and prebiotics are compounds derived from non-digestible carbohydrates such as fibre.

What are the different types of prebiotics?

There are various types of prebiotics. These include:

• Fructans such as inulin and fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS) can promote directly or indirectly several bacterial species.

• Galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS) can greatly stimulate Bifidobacteria and Lactobacilli, as well as Enterobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes to a lesser extent [2].

• Hemicellulose-derived oligosaccharides such as arabinoxylans. Arabinoxylans could produce a strong prebiotic activity, in particular bifidogenic.

• Starch and glucose-derived oligosaccharides, a type of starch resistant to small intestine digestion, can stimulate the production of butyrate, a short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) [3]. Polydextrose, a glucose-derived oligosaccharide, can also stimulate Bifidobacteria [4].

• Pectic oligosaccharides (POS): some oligosaccharides come from a polysaccharide called pectin. This type of oligosaccharide is called pectic oligosaccharide (POS).

• Non-carbohydrate oligosaccharides: although carbohydrates are more likely to meet the criteria to be considered prebiotics, there are other compounds not classified as carbohydrates, but that can be classified as prebiotics, such as some flavanols [5].

Did you know you can combine prebiotics and probiotics to create synbiotic dietary supplements? Read more about that here!

What are the health benefits of prebiotics?

Research shows that prebiotics have a beneficial effect on gut health, which is directly linked to overall well-being. In addition, prebiotics exert their positive effects via the following pathways:

• Microbiota support: prebiotics provide energy sources to gut microbiota. This way, they are able to modulate the function and composition of these microorganisms [6].

• Immune system modulation: SCFAs have multiple benefits for the immune system, such as increasing antibody responses towards pathogens [7].

• Colorectal cancer risk reduction: fermentation products of probiotics, such as butyrate, have possible protective effects against the risk of colorectal cancer [8].

• Infants gastrointestinal disorder prevention: prebiotics can redice the risk of development of necrotizing enterocolitis in preterm infants [9].

• Skin irritation conditions: the risk of development and the severity of atopic dermatitis [10, 11] could decrease after prebiotic intake.

• Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) risk reduction due to the potential of prebiotics to reduce inflammatory markers and improve lipid profile [7].

How can I add prebiotics to my diet?

Prebiotics play an important role in human health, so it is important to consume them. They can be found in foods that are high in fibre, such as vegetables, fruits, legumes and whole-grain products. Foods that are high in prebiotic fibre include:

• Wheat
• Soybeans
• Oats
• Bananas
• Tomatoes
• Berries
• Asparagus
• Garlic
• Leeks
• Onions
• Chicory

Another option to increase prebiotic intake is supplements, purchased in health food stores and online. They are usually available in capsule form, in powder blends or even in bars.

Prebiotics are generally considered safe. They can have some minor side effects, such as diarrhea, bloating and flatulence. However, prebiotics’ chain length is the main parameter related to the development of these side effects.

Prebiotics with a shorter chain length have more side effects because they ferment earlier and more rapidly, while longer chain prebiotics – such as arabinoxylans from wheat– ferment slowier.


postbiotics

Exploring the power of postbiotics: benefits and uses

Exploring the power of postbiotics: benefits and uses

October 18th, 2023

Currently, probiotics and prebiotics are widely known for their favorable impact on gut health. More recently, the focus has expanded to include postbiotics, which encompass products or byproducts generated through microbial fermentation and are also acknowledged for their health advantages. Nevertheless, these postbiotics remain unfamiliar to most consumers. Dive into our new blog to find out more!

postbiotics

What are postbiotics?

Gut health is key to your overall well-being and there are many ways to support your gut health. Prebiotics and probiotics are well-known, but what about probiotics?

Postbiotics encompass a class of substances defined as “preparations containing non-living microorganisms or their components, which bring about positive health effects for the host.” In simpler terms, they refer to the byproducts or metabolic products that result from the fermentation processes of bacteria.

This category of postbiotics encompasses various kinds of compounds. Among them are short-chain fatty acids, known for their multiple health advantages, as well as fragments of microbial cells, functional proteins, extracellular polysaccharides, cell lysates, and teichoic acid.

In contrast to probiotics, postbiotics offer health benefits without requiring a live state. This characteristic contributes to their stability compared to the live bacteria they originate from. [1]

Why should I use postbiotics?

A question on your mind might be: why should you consider postbiotics when you’re already using pre- and probiotics?

It’s crucial to recognize that everyone’s gut microbiota composition differs. As a result, the way various components are processed can vary from person to person.

This means that the impact of probiotics and prebiotics on health can differ among individuals. A way to control for this is by consuming postbiotics. You are then directly taking the beneficial components, so differences in microbiota composition don’t have an effect in this case.

If you’re interested in learning more about prebiotics, you can refer to this article. Alternatively, if you’re already familiar with prebiotics, you might find this article on synbiotics to be of interest!

What are the advantages for health that postbiotics offer?

Research indicates that postbiotics can bring forth a range of health benefits, including:

Balancing the microbiota: Elements found in postbiotics, like butyrate, a type of short-chain fatty acid, prove advantageous for maintaining gut health. [2]

Influencing the immune system: Butyrate has the ability to trigger the generation of T cells within the intestinal tract, thereby aiding in the regulation of immune responses. Additional components, such as fragments of microbial cell walls, can enhance the production of cytokines—chemical messengers that mitigate inflammation and bolster immune reactions. [2,3]

Shaping metabolic processes: Short-chain fatty acids such as propionate play a role in enhancing insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance. Simultaneously, butyrate spurs the generation of an antioxidant called glutathione. [1,2]

Assisting in weight loss: Short-chain fatty acids could contribute to weight loss by influencing eating behaviors. This is attributed to the release of hormones that induce a sense of fullness. [1]

Easing symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS): In a study involving 443 individuals with IBS, the administration of orally ingested, heat-inactivated Bifidobacterium bifidum, a postbiotic, notably alleviated IBS-related symptoms such as abdominal pain, discomfort, bloating, and irregular bowel habits. [4] Curious to read about the effect of pre- and probiotics on IBS symptoms? Read more here!

Potential additional advantages: Administering inactivated lactic acid bacteria orally might aid in eradicating Helicobacter pylori infection, addressing chronic unexplained diarrhea, and mitigating the adverse impacts of stress. [1]

How can I incorporate postbiotics into my diet effectively?

Postbiotics might not be as readily available as probiotics and prebiotics, but you can acquire them from health food stores or online retailers. They are generally regarded as safe and well-tolerated.

Given that postbiotics are a product of bacterial fermentation within your gut, you can enhance their production by consuming foods abundant in probiotics and prebiotics. Probiotic-rich options include fermented foods like yogurt, kefir, tempeh, and kombucha. For prebiotics, focus on incorporating high-fiber foods into your diet, such as vegetables and whole-grain products.


microbiomex or gut health

Everything you need to know about MicrobiomeX® and gut health

Everything you need to know about MicrobiomeX® and gut health

October 11th, 2023

The gut microbiome plays a vital role in our digestive system, responsible for digesting nutrients while also serving as a central component of our gut wall and immune system. Maintaining a healthy microbiome profile is of utmost importance and ongoing research continues to shed light on its intricate functions. In this article, we introduce MicrobiomeX®, one of our sustainably sourced, plant-based active ingredients supported by clinical research. Explore the benefits of incorporating MicrobiomeX® into your formulation.

microbiomex or gut health

What is gut health and why is the gut microbiome important?

The gastrointestinal system is often referred to as the ‘gut’, including the stomach, intestines, and colon. Its primary function is to digest and absorb nutrients, essential for meeting our energy needs.

Within the gut approximately 200 billion species of bacteria reside, collectively known as the gut microbiome. Many of these microorganisms play a vital role in food digestion and are crucial for maintaining a healthy gut and overall well-being.

It’s important to recognize that the condition of the gut microbiome can significantly impact physical health, but also mental health. Well-established connections exist between the gut microbiome and various aspects such as the immune system, the gut wall, mental health, autoimmune diseases, sleep, skin health etc. (1). Numerous factors, including diet, age, and lifestyle, can influence the gut microbiome. Hence, it is clearly important to maintain and support a healthy gut microbiota through nutritious foods and supplements.

 

Tips for improving Gut Health

Enhancing gut health is possible through dietary and lifestyle choices. Certain foods are known for their positive impact on gut health, particularly fermented foods and fiber-rich options. By increasing their intake, we can reduce the risk of developing gut inflammation and metabolic diseases. Incorporating physical activity and using supplements, including prebiotics and probiotics, are additional strategies. Emerging products now focus on non-fermenting plant-based ingredients, such as prebiotics and citrus flavonoids.

gut health and microbiome

Exploring Prebiotics, Probiotics and More

 

  • Prebiotics: these non-digestible food ingredients offer health benefits by selectively stimulating the growth and activity of specific intestinal bacteria (2). Foods rich in prebiotics include onions, garlic, greens, cereals and bananas.

 

  • Probiotics: Live microorganisms that benefit the host by reducing harmful bacteria and supporting the gut’s natural flora (3). Consider consuming fermented foods and probiotic supplements, such as yogurt, tempeh, kombucha, and kimchi, to promote good bacteria.

 

  • Postbiotics: the byproducts of digestion (4). vitamins B and K, antimicrobial peptides, amino acids, and short-chain fatty acids, play a role in supporting good bacteria. Some postbiotics, like de-glycosylated ‘active’ flavonoids, are generated by specific beneficial bacteria and are also known as flavobiotics.

 

  • Synbiotics: a powerful combination of probiotics and prebiotics (5). As mentioned above, prebiotics support the function of probiotics, working in synergy to optimize digestive health and bolster the immune system.

Understanding flavonoids

What are flavonoids?   Flavonoids are natural substances found in plants, known for their diverse health benefits. They have become an indispensable part of the nutraceutical market, due to their ability to modulate key cellular enzymes and their antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, and anticarcinogenic properties.

 

Fortunately, sourcing flavonoids is sustainable. They are primarily extracted from immature fruits in an eco-friendly manner. For example, orange and grapefruit trees bloom annually, but not all blossoms can become full grown fruits. The trees undergo a natural selection process called ‘fruit drop,’ shedding immature fruits to conserve their resources.

 

What are the benefits of using immature fruits?

After the fruit drop, immature oranges and grapefruits are not suitable for raw consumption. Still, they are full of valuable nutrients. To harness these nutrients, the most practical approach is to process them into a powdered form, which can be easily incorporated into nutritional supplements.

immature oranges and sweet oranges

Why do immature oranges and grapefruits matter?

These immature fruits are particularly rich in a nutrient of interest, hesperidin. By standardizing the extract from immature oranges for hesperidin content, we can create an eco-friendly and sustainable ingredient. As mentioned earlier, fruit drop is a natural occurrence, and these immature oranges become a byproduct that we can utilize. Similarly, another valuable ingredient, naringin, can be extracted from immature grapefruits.

 

What are hesperidin and naringin?

Hesperidin and naringin are flavonoids with numerous health benefits. What sets them apart is their unique ability to reach the colon intact, where they directly nourish the gut microbiome. This, in turn, leads to the production of short-chain fatty acids (6, 7), including the vital butyrate, the primary energy source for colon wall cells.

 

These flavonoids are abundantly found in citrus fruits like oranges, grapefruits, and lemons (8). The extraction of valuable flavonoids from such citrus fruits is a well-established practice. Extensive studies (9) confirm that a combination of hesperidin and naringin positively affects the gut microbiome composition by improving the short-chain fatty acids profile, mainly increasing butyrate content

 

How can hesperidin and naringin improve gut health?

The unique chemical structure of hesperidin and naringin allows them to traverse the digestive system, arriving mostly intact in the colon. Here, the gut microbiota breaks them down into their active forms, hesperetin and naringenin, both highly bioavailable and transported to various tissues via the bloodstream.

 

Notably, hesperidin and naringin selectively nourish specific bacteria species, such as Bifidobacterium, Roseburia, and Lactobacilli (10). This promotes the growth of beneficial bacteria, reinforcing the gut’s defense against harmful pathogens. Additionally, these flavonoids play a pivotal role in supporting the immune system by inhibiting oxidative stress and gut inflammation.

 

In summary, the journey from immature fruits to powdered extracts of hesperidin and naringin offers an eco-friendly and sustainable way to enhance gut health and overall well-being, while also minimizing waste and maximizing the benefits of these valuable compounds.

microbiomex and immature oranges

What is MicrobiomeX®?

MicrobiomeX® is a potent blend of extracts derived from Citrus sinensis (immature oranges) and Citrus paradisi (grapefruit). It stands as a pioneering Flavobiotic®, designed to fortify the gut barrier and unlock the full potential of the gut microbiome. Remarkably, MicrobiomeX® is entirely plant-based and produced sustainably. It adheres to multiple dietary preferences, including vegan, halal, kosher, gluten-free, and hormone-free. Notably, MicrobiomeX® distinguishes itself by being non-fermenting, with its flavonoids activated through a microbiota-driven process known as de-glycosylation.

 

Extensive research conducted by BioActor, through pre-clinical and clinical trials, has illuminated the remarkable benefits of MicrobiomeX®. Consumption of MicrobiomeX® leads to an enhanced profile of short-chain fatty acids, with a specific increase in butyrate. Additionally, calprotectin levels decrease, signaling a reduction in gut inflammation.

 

Who can benefit from taking MicrobiomeX®?

MicrobiomeX® can be beneficial for everyone who wants to immprove their microbiome composition and strengthen their immunity. For a more targeted approach, this blend of sweet orange and pomegranate extracts could help the following groups:

 

MicrobiomeX® is a promising solution for individuals struggling with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Notably, MicrobiomeX®’ non-fermenting nature reduces the production of gas and intestinal discomfort. Additionally, it fosters the proliferation of Bifidobacterium, a beneficial bacteria associated with improved gastrointestinal symptoms in individuals with IBS.

 

Another demographic that can find MicrobiomeX® beneficial is athletes, particularly those engaged in endurance sports. Endurance athletes frequently experience gastrointestinal discomfort due to the extended and repetitive nature of activities like running or cycling. MicrobiomeX® offers a potential remedy by reducing gut permeability and bolstering the gut barrier.

What is our source of citrus flavonoids?

Nestled in the heart of Spain, at Finca la Gloria, lies a family-run orange plantation. Here, eco-friendly methods are employed to safeguard the trees, eschewing the use of pesticides. Every year, the orange trees burst with blooms. After the natural selection process known as ‘fruit drop,’ immature oranges fall from the trees. Fortunately, they are readily available for us to harvest and extract all benefits they can offer.

Learn more about MicrobiomeX®

If you are curious to know more about MicrobiomeX®, you can check out the product page of MicrobiomeX® or its website.


gut health or butyrate or short chain fatty acids

New clinical study: MicrobiomeX® improves microbiota composition and SCFA production

New clinical study: MicrobiomeX® improves microbiota composition and SCFA production

Maastricht, The Netherlands, 29th September  2023

Press release

New clinical and pre-clinical data from a study with MicrobiomeX® have been published in a peer-reviewed journal. It is a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled parallel study performed by scientists of Maastricht University, the department of Gastro-enterology of Maastricht University Medical Center and BioActor. It shows the potential of MicrobiomeX® to improve short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) profiles in the intestine. After 12 weeks of daily supplementation, there was a significant shift in the SCFA profile (p=0.022) towards butyrate. In addition, a reduction in faecal calprotectin levels was observed, a marker of gut inflammation. Interestingly, a new in-vitro study in the TIM2 model, where faecal samples from volunteers were tested, also showed a strong increase in butyrate production. These new clinical and pre-clinical results highlight MicrobiomeX®’s potential to support intestinal microbiota of subjects with features of metabolic syndrome.

gut health or butyrate or short chain fatty acids

MicrobiomeX®: an an active ingredient supporting the gut microbiome, developed by BioActor

MicrobiomeX® is a clinically validated blend of Citrus sinensis (sweet orange) and Citrus paradisi (grapefruit) extracts. These fruits are naturally rich in flavonoids, known for their anti-inflammatory and antiviral properties (1, 2). MicrobiomeX® already showed promising potential to reduce markers of gut inflammation and increase SCFAs in previous in-vitro and ex-vivo studies conducted with this ingredient (3, 4). Supplement brands all over the world have adopted MicrobiomeX® in their formulations, typically positioned for improving gut microbiome balance and immune system regulation.

The study: Citrus Extract High in Flavonoids Beneficially Alters Intestinal Metabolic Responses in Subjects with Features of Metabolic Syndrome

 

Introduction

This study (5) was published in the international journal “Foods”. The western diet and lifestyle may be the leading causes for the development of various metabolic disorders. An overlooked factor is the gut microbiota composition, which should be considered as a factor determining health status. A healthy gut is related to mental wellbeing and strong immunity. This study aimed to evaluate the benefits of MicrobiomeX® supplementation on the intestinal microbiome of subjects with metabolic disorder traits.

Methods

Fifty adult subjects with features of metabolic syndrome took part in the study. They ingested 500mg MicrobiomeX® or placebo daily for 12 weeks. Additionally, seven volunteers provided faecal samples that were introduced into a TIM-2 system for further analysis. The TIM-2 is a computer-controlled model in an anaerobic environment that replicates the appropriate conditions for microbial growth in the human colon and is able to measure microbiota composition and SCFA production.

Results

A significant shift in the SCFA profile towards more butyrate (p=0.022) was observed in the MicrobiomeX® group after the 12-week supplementation period. An increase in SCFA production was also found in the TIM-2 model, that was mainly due to an increased production of butyrate, acetate and valerate. Additionally, in the MicrobiomeX® group, a trend in calprotectin reduction was observed, which is a marker of gut inflammation. Both in vivo and in vitro data confirm the benefits of MicrobiomeX on gut health, specifically the increased butyrate production and improved SCFA profile. These findings are in line with previous in vitro results and show that MicrobiomeX® can beneficially modulate the gut microbiome.

Conclusion

This study demonstrates the great potential of MicrobiomeX® in playing a role in gut health modulation. This is indicated by the significant increase in SCFAs, mainly butyrate, and a reduction in calprotectin, as found in the present study. By adding MicrobiomeX® to your supplement, you can offer customers a science-based support for gut health. It is an alternative to common prebiotics and an ideal partner for synbiotic formulation targeting gut health and immunity.

Click here to read the complete publication

About BioActor

BioActor, based in Maastricht, Netherlands is part of the Solabia Group and has developed a range of proprietary bioactive ingredients for the nutrition & healthcare industry. We focus on the development of innovative activities that address active living and healthy ageing. Our goal is to provide the nutrition & healthcare industry with science-based innovations that confer a real health benefit to the consumer.

Feel free to contact via info@bioactor.com for more information on the possibilities MicrobiomeXl® has to offer. Further information can also be found on: https://solabianutrition.com/products/microbiomex/ and https://microbiomex.com/


BIOACTOR and PIXIENCE start collaboration on validation of skin imaging technology in nutrition studies

BIOACTOR and PIXIENCE start collaboration on validation of skin imaging technology in nutrition studies

BIOACTOR and PIXIENCE start collaboration on validation of skin imaging technology in nutrition studies

MAASTRICHT/TOULOUSE, August 22nd, 2023

Press release
BIOACTOR and PIXIENCE announce the start of a collaboration to test and validate an innovative skin imaging and testing technology in the context of a clinical study with a nutritional bioactive.

BIOACTOR and PIXIENCE start collaboration on validation of skin imaging technology in nutrition studies

BIOACTOR and PIXIENCE announce the start of a collaboration to test and validate an innovative skin imaging and testing technology in the context of a clinical study with a nutritional bioactive.

PIXIENCE has developed an innovative skin image capturing device (C-Cube) and image analysis software (QuickScale) for the evaluation of several skin parameters, including the evaluation of 3D images.

BIOACTOR has expertise in the clinical validation of health effects of natural compounds and is now setting-up a clinical testing platform around nutritional actives for skin health.

PIXIENCE is developing the C-Cube Clinical Edition and BIOACTOR will carry-out beta testing of the Clinical Edition in a new clinical study on an oral nutritional product. PIXIENCE will provide technical assistance to BIOACTOR for the skin image analysis in this new clinical study.

Sebastien Mangeruca, CEO of PIXIENCE comments:
We have initially developed our C-Cube and QuickScale suite of technologies for the evaluation of topical cosmetic products. BIOACTOR’s experience in running clinical studies for nutrition and its active programme around nutrition and skin health, makes them an ideal partner for testing and validating of our C-Cube Clinical Edition for nutrition studies”.

Hans van der Saag, CEO of BIOACTOR comments:
BIOACTOR is delighted to work with PIXIENCE, as PIXIENCE has developed a best in class skin imaging and analysis technology that will allow us to further improve our skin health for nutrition platform. BIOACTOR wants to bring clinically backed innovation to the nutrition industry. BIOACTOR tests all of its products in scientifically robust human intervention studies, working with partners like PIXIENCE and the Department of Health and Nutrition of Maastricht University.

About BIOACTOR

BIOACTOR, based in Maastricht, Netherlands, is a product development company that develops and supplies proprietary bioactive formulations to the health and sports nutrition industry. All BIOACTOR’s products are clinically tested, doping-free and from natural origin. The main focus areas are: gut microbiome, brain health, energy & vitality and skin health.

For more information, please contact:

BioActor
Hans van der Saag, CEO
Email: hans.vandersaag@bioactor.com

Pixience
Sébastien Mangeruca, CEO
Email: Sebastien.mangeruca@pixience.com
www.pixience.com


how a healthy microbiome boosts your immune system

How a healthy microbiome boosts your immune system

Unlocking the power of your gut: how a healthy microbiome boosts your immune system

August 18th, 2023

Did you know that your immune system’s performance is intricately tied to the health of your gut microbiome? In this article, we delve into the fascinating connection between your gut microbiome and immune system. Discover the key role of the gut microbiome in immune function and learn about the dietary components that can nurture a diverse and thriving gut ecosystem.

how a healthy microbiome boosts your immune system

A symbiotic relationship: gut microbiome and immune system harmony

The human body is a bustling ecosystem housing trillions of microorganisms, collectively known as the microbiome. Among these, the gut microbiome stands out as a vibrant community of bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites (1).

This intricate network collaborates to maintain a balanced blend of beneficial microorganisms, protecting us from potential invaders.

Recent advancements have illuminated the gut microbiome’s dynamic involvement in our well-being, extending beyond passive existence.

This intricate web of microorganisms actively influences various bodily functions, including bolstering the development and efficacy of the immune system. Our immune system, in turn, maintains a delicate equilibrium, defending against pathogens while avoiding autoimmune responses (2).

Microbiome’s immune-boosting strategies

Short-Chain Fatty Acids (SCFAs)

At the heart of the gut microbiota’s influence on immunity lies the production of Short-Chain Fatty Acids (SCFAs) through dietary fiber fermentation in the large intestine (3).

These SCFAs, such as acetate, propionate, and butyrate, play a pivotal role in maintaining gut balance and modulating immune responses. They orchestrate immune cell functions, like regulatory T cells and antigen-presenting cells, and stimulate cytokine and chemokine production, bolstering immunity.

Furthermore, SCFAs can directly quell pathogenic activity by suppressing virulence-related genes, curbing potential threats.

Fortifying the barricade: tight junctions

The gut’s tight junctions act as gatekeepers, upholding the integrity of the intestinal barrier (4). Inflammation or infections can disrupt these barriers, allowing undesirable substances to escape into the bloodstream, triggering immune responses (5, 6).

SCFAs step in as allies here, contributing to the assembly of robust tight junctions within intestinal cell walls. This reinforcement prevents the escape of harmful toxins from the gut, bolstering the gut wall’s ability to shield against infections (5).

When this symbiotic relationship thrives, the immune system guards us against infections. However, an unbalanced microbiota composition might trigger inflammation, autoimmune disorders, and chronic diseases (1, 5).

Strategies to help the gut ecosystem flourish

A diverse and balanced gut microbiome is universally recognized as vital for our health (7). Research highlights that such diversity empowers immune responses against infections while reducing autoimmune responses. Conversely, a low-diversity microbiome is linked to chronic inflammation and an elevated risk of colorectal cancer.

To nurture a flourishing and diverse gut microbiome, prioritizing a balanced diet and healthy lifestyle is very important.

Choose for a spectrum of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and lean protein sources. These foods, rich in fiber, prebiotics, and nutrients, provide nourishment for beneficial gut bacteria.

1. Fiber: the gut’s aid for immunity

Fiber’s role in gut health is crucial, as it bolsters microbiome diversity. A diet rich in fiber, found in fruits, vegetables, and whole grains, enhances gut bacteria abundance and diversity. This, in turn, augments immune function, reducing chronic disease risks (8).

2. Prebiotics: fuel for beneficial bacteria

Prebiotics, a specific type of fiber, serve as sustenance for our beneficial gut inhabitants. Foods like onions, garlic, leeks, asparagus, bananas, and whole grains are brimming with prebiotics, nurturing a thriving microbial community.

3. Water: hydration and gut motility

Staying hydrated is crucial for optimal gut function. Drinking plenty of water helps maintain proper gut motility and prevents constipation. Adequate hydration supports the movement of food through the digestive tract, allowing beneficial bacteria to thrive and contribute to a healthier gut.

4. Probiotics and postbiotics: allies for immunity

Fermented foods like yogurt, kefir, sauerkraut, and kimchi harbor probiotics—live bacteria conferring health benefits. Additionally, postbiotics, metabolic by-products or components produced during fermentation, like SCFAs, amplify the benefits. Consuming these products directly ingests these components, bolstering health.

5. Synbiotics: Uniting Prebiotics and Probiotics

Synbiotics, the blend of prebiotics and probiotics, synergistically promote gut health. Examples include yogurt with inulin or fructooligosaccharides (FOS), and kefir with galactooligosaccharides (GOS).

6. Reducing stress levels

Besides diet-related strategies, there are other ways to help your gut stay healthy. Stress can negatively impact the gut-brain axis and disrupt gut health. Practicing stress-reduction techniques like meditation or deep breathing can have a positive impact on both your mental well-being and gut health.

Cultivate your gut for immune resilience

In summary, the gut microbiome profoundly impacts the immune system’s effectiveness. A thriving and varied gut ecosystem fortifies us against infections and chronic ailments, while an imbalanced one heightens vulnerability. By embracing a well-rounded diet full of fiber, prebiotics, and fermented foods, we can nurture our gut microbiome, bolstering overall health.


New publication Naxus® consumption supports weight management through reduction of actual calorie intake in an ad libitum meal

New publication: Naxus® consumption supports weight management through reduction of actual calorie intake in an ad libitum meal

New publication: Naxus® consumption supports weight management through reduction of actual calorie intake in an ad libitum meal

Maastricht, The Netherlands, 27th July 2023

Press release
This randomized controlled crossover study showed Naxus®’ potential for appetite control and weight management. In a 21-day trial with healthy adult males, it was reported that consumption of a blend of Naxus® and inulin showed significantly lower calorie intake in an ad libitum meal (838 kcal vs. 1023 kcal) while reporting no changes in appetite. The blend was also shown to increase faecal SCFA concentrations. These results highlight Naxus®’s potential to transform appetite regulation.

New publication Naxus® consumption supports weight management through reduction of actual calorie intake in an ad libitum meal

Naxus®: clinically validated and developed by BioActor

Naxus® is a clinically validated arabinoxylan extract developed by BioActor, derived from wheat endosperm. It has been extensively studied and shown to have beneficial effects on microbiota composition, glycaemic control, and immune system function.

Naxus® promotes the growth of beneficial bacteria, production of Short Chain Fatty Acids (SCFA) and improves glycaemic control by inducing GPR43 signaling which leads to reduced glucose peaks and improved insulin sensitivity (1, 2). It also strengthens the immune system through various mechanisms (3, 4, 5). It is a well-researched ingredient with significant potential for enhancing overall health and well-being.

The study: Chronic consumption of a blend of inulin and Naxus® reduces energy intake in an ad libitum meal but does not influence perceptions of appetite and satiety

Introduction

Two dominant bacterial strains account for more than 90% of the total bacterial gut community: Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes (6). They are widely believed to have important effects on the maintenance of normal intestinal homeostasis. Stressors associated with modern lifestyles (e.g. low fibre diet) can chronically change the bacterial gut composition and lead to the increase of more virulent microbes that adversely affect the health of the host.

Gut microbiota break down fibre from our diet and produce SCFAs such as propionate, acetate, and butyrate as a result. These metabolites lead to activation of a pathway that is linked to appetite reduction.

Specifically, propionate and acetate bind to a receptor called GPR43, which is found in cells lining our stomach and intestines (7). Activation of GPR43 leads to a cascade of signals eventually triggering the production of GLP-1 and PYY, two hormones involved in inducing satiety.

Naxus has previously been shown to increase propionate levels and GLP-1 production (8). In this current study, it was investigated whether a blend of Naxus® and inulin would positively affect satiety and energy intake.

Methods

In this cross-over study, the authors investigated the effect of inulin + Naxus® on 20 healthy adult males aged between 22 and 55 with no evidence of metabolic or cardiovascular disease.

Each participant took part in both control and intervention conditions, each lasting 21 days. Both the treatment and control groups had to drink two sachets of dry powder dissolved in 150 ml of water daily for 21 days. Therefore, the participants consumed the intervention (or the control) sachet for 21 days following a 14-day period washout, and afterwards the control (or the intervention) sachet for an additional 21 days. The intervention sachet contained 2 g of Naxus® and 2 g inulin, whereas the control sachet contained 4 g of maltodextrin.

After a 14-day wash-out period, participants switched to the other drink for another 21 days. The study comprised 4 visits to assess the participants’ perceived satiety and appetite, the energy intake in an ad libitum meal, faecal SCFA concentration, and the faecal microbiota composition.

Results

Appetite control and calorie intake

The study found that the mean energy intake in an ad libitum meal were significantly lower during the treatment period (838 kcal) compared to the control period (1023 kcal) (p<0.05).

Surprisingly, no changes in self-reported appetite were found. This difference between self-reported appetite and actual calorie intake is common in studies involving prebiotics, which is why measuring actual food intake provides a more objective measure.

Naxus and Inulin results on kcal intake

Microbial composition

Significant changes in the microbial composition of fecal samples were noted, showing noteworthy increases in the abundance of Bifidobacteria (p = 0.035), Lactobacilli (p = 0.061), and Propionibacteria (p = 0.02).

Short-chain fatty acids

Moreover, these changes were accompanied by an elevation in the concentration of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), which are known to be associated with gut health. More specifically, an increase of acetate in the faeces sample was reported after 21 days (p=0.02). Acetate has the ability to independently influence appetite, which may explain why the participants consumed fewer calories during a single meal.

The hypothesized increase in propionate levels in the faeces sample was only minimal and not statistically significant (p=0.07). However, it is important to note that faecal propionate concentration alone does not reflect the absorption by the body. Additionally, the signals of propionate in the liver and bloodstream, which were not measured in this study, could potentially have a more significant impact on appetite regulation.

Triple effect

Overall, the results show that the chronic consumption of a blend of inulin and Naxus® leads to a reduction in energy intake, an increase in faecal SCFA concentrations, and an increase in beneficial gut bacteria.

Conclusion

This research indicates that a combination of inulin and Naxus® has positive effects on gut health and confirms existing data that Naxus® positively influences appetite control.

This publication also emphasizes the importance of new studies focusing on the effect of Naxus® on enhancing and tailoring nutritional products to promote satiety and help weight management.

Click here to read the complete publication

About BioActor

BioActor, based in Maastricht, Netherlands is part of the Solabia Group and has developed a range of proprietary bioactive ingredients for the nutrition & healthcare industry. We focus on the development of innovative activities that address active living and healthy ageing. Our goal is to provide the nutrition & healthcare industry with science-based innovations that confer a real health benefit to the consumer.

Feel free to contact via info@bioactor.com for more information on the possibilities Naxus® has to offer. Further information can also be found on: www.naxus.nl or www.bioactor.com/products/naxus.


study-wheat-arabinoxylans-on-the-gut-microbiota

New publication demonstrates potential of Naxus® for alleviating IBD through gut microbiota alterations and increased butyrate production in mice

New publication demonstrates potential of Naxus® for alleviating IBD through gut microbiota alterations and increased butyrate production in mice

Maastricht, The Netherlands, 1st May 2023

Press release
In the present study published in Molecules, the leading international, peer-reviewed, open-access journal of chemistry, the authors evaluated the potential positive effects of arabinoxylans (AX) contained in Naxus® on T-cell-dependent colitis. The findings of the study showed that Naxus® was able to induce peripherally induced Treg (pTreg) cells in the colon. This resulted in a reduction of T-cell-dependent chronic colitis due to the increased levels of butyrate-producing bacteria and luminal butyrate levels. These findings implicate that there could be a role for Naxus® in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease.

study-wheat-arabinoxylans-on-the-gut-microbiota

Naxus®: a product researched and developed by BioActor

NAXUS®, an arabinoxylan extract obtained from the endosperm of wheat and is known for its beneficial health effects.

Wheat arabinoxylans (AX) are, in turn, a type of non-starch polysaccharide found in the cell walls of wheat grains. AXs are typically composed of a linear β (1-4)-linked xylan backbone with side residues of a-1-arabinofuranose units attached via α-(1-3) and/or α-(1-2) linkage.

Several clinical studies have shown that Naxus® is a powerful and well-tolerated prebiotic which induces a positive effect on the immune system and blood sugar levels by modulating the microbiome composition and Short Chain Fatty Acids (SCFA) production.

Effect of Naxus® on the Gut Microbiota Composition and Colonic Regulatory T Cells: in vitro and in vivo study

Introduction

The study was conducted by the group of Seita Chudan and the groups’ aim was to to understand the effect of wheat-derived arabinoxylan on gut microbiota, colonic regulatory T cells (Tregs) which are a specific subset of T cells that suppresses the immune response, and experimental colitis, this way, discussing the importance of a healthy gut microbiota and its connection to immune function and disease.

Many studies have looked at how AXs from wheat affect the bacteria and compounds in our gut, as well as a type of antibody present in the immune system called Immunoglobulin A (IgA).
However, not many studies have shown how AX might be helpful in treating Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD), a condition that is characterized by inflammation of the GI tract. One recent study has looked at how AX might help with a type of IBD called DSS-induced colitis, but it’s still unclear if AX can prevent colitis.

Therefore, it is important to understand how wheat AXs affect the immune system and colitis, particularly in cases caused by the acquired immune system.

Methods

In this study, healthy and chronic colitis model mice were fed with food containing cellulose or Naxus® for 2–6 weeks and subjected to subsequent analysis of the gut microbiota composition and the number of colonic regulatory T cells in both groups.

Results

The results of this study indicate that Naxus® promotes the development of colonic pTregs and helps to reduce T-cell-dependent chronic colitis. The number of colonic regulatory T cells was significantly higher in the Naxus® group compared to the control group. These positive effects may be due to changes in the gut microbiota and increased levels of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), especially butyrate.

results-wheat-arabinoxylans-effects-study

Table 1: Quantification of fecal SCFA in mice fed with food containing CE (cellulose) or AX (n = 8)

Butyrate is produced by certain bacteria in the Lachnospiraceae family, such as Eubacterium and Roseburia spp., Increases in Lachnospiraceae bacteria were linked to an increase in fecal butyrate concentration and a greater number of colonic Tregs in the Naxus®-fed mice.

In a T cell transfer model of chronic colitis, Naxus® was found to improve body weight loss and reduce colonic tissue inflammation, possibly through Treg induction. In addition, in this colitis model, wheat-derived arabinoxylan decreased TNFα production from type 1 helper T cells.
Therefore, Naxus® could be a useful prebiotic for preventing colitis by modifying the gut microbiota and shifting the metabolite production more towards butyrate.

Conclusion

This study shows that Naxus® has positive effects in a mouse model of chronic colitis. These improvements are linked to the alterations in the gut microenvironment by regulating the gut microbiota composition and increasing the number of colonic regulatory T cells, which could have implications for the prevention and treatment of inflammatory bowel disease and other immune-related diseases.

Click here to read the complete publication

About BioActor

BioActor, based in Maastricht, Netherlands, is a product development company that has developed a range of proprietary bioactive ingredients for the nutrition & healthcare industry. The company focuses on the development of innovative activities that address active living and healthy ageing. The goal is to provide the nutrition & healthcare industry with science-based innovations that confer a real health benefit to the consumer.
Feel free to contact via info@bioactor.com for more information on the possibilities Naxus® has to offer.
Further information can also be found on: www.naxus.nl.